The Many Faces of a Tarpon Fisherman – A Photo Essay

Fly fishing is one of the most demanding, but rewarding type of fishing around.  It requires skill, knowledge, concentration, Margaritaville music, and, yes, luck.  It might be instructive to record the many phases of this sport, from the point of view of the fisherman.  I think that you’ll agree that you can learn the whole story of this sport by watching the expressions on the face of the angler from starting out to finally relaxing after the catch.  You can learn so much from the arching of an eyebrow, the curling of a lip, the scowling of a brow, or the appearance of a dimple.  So, without further ado, and mindful of the fact that a picture is worth a thousand words, here is what it’s like to catch a tarpon on fly…

1

Scanning The Horizon For Fins

 

2

Notice the excitement as he spots a school of HUGE Tarpon!

 

3

Concentrating as he retrieves the fly

 

4

Total Excitement as Tarponzilla lunges at the fly!

 

5

Notice the Determined Grimace as He Sets the Hook!

 

6

He’s in awe as the tarpon jumps and jumps and jumps!

 

7

The Look of Fear as it Charges the Boat and Tries To Jump In!

 

8

Relief as the Huge Beast Comes Alongside and is Released!

 

9

Satisfaction and Pride While Relaxing After the Fight!

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Pine Island Fish Pix

This is what a half day off at the office looks like around here!snook 1  He was 39 inches and a whopping 20 pounds! Way To Go Lisa! After reeling this bad boy in and getting a picture he was safely released, so no worries, you can have your chance to catch him too!!

So, do you think you can do better? If so, let us know. You and your catch will be featured in the Fish Pix section here on the blog of our www.team-flamingo.com website. Send in your fishing photos to Sales@team-flamingo.com along with a description of who it is and some stats on the fish. Remember the most important rule of fishing. After a fish is released there is no way to prove how big it was. We’ll publish them here and you and your fish can become semi-famous!

Pine Island Fish Pix

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We have asked everyone to send in photos of their catch for us to put on the blog. Large or small, we said that we wanted them all. Here we have Mike holding a 39 inch Redfish. 

So, do you think you can do better? If so, let us know. You and your catch will be featured in the Fish Pix section here on the blog of our www.team-flamingo.com website. Send in your fishing photos to Sales@team-flamingo.com along with a description of who it is and some stats on the fish. Remember the most important rule of fishing. After a fish is released there is no way to prove how big it was. We’ll publish them here and you and your fish can become semi-famous.

Pine Island Fish Pix, Part 21

We have asked everyone to send in photos of their catch for us to put on the blog. Large or small, we said that we wanted them all. So, here we have a local fisherman holding what appears to be a seatrout. It is a little hard to tell without binoculars, because it was taken, after all, from a couple of boat lengths away.

But we don’t want to discourage anyone from sending in photos of their catch. And this picture definitely proves that we will publish your fish, no matter what the size!!! So, send them in to us and maybe you will be the next star of our blog.

Seriously, this is a pretty good sized trout. And the picture was taken from some distance away. So, we will pronounce this a great catch! Send us your great catches and maybe we will make you semi-famous, too!

Pine Island Fish Pix, Part 20

This is our fishing and boat show buddy Paul Wedeking. And the fish he is holding is reputedly a 25 pound redfish! Paul’s wife Debby was so impressed with the fish (and presumably Paul, too) that she entered this photo into the BoatUS October’s monthly photo contest. And Paul and his fish are now the Catch of the Month! You can check it out on the BoatUS website by clicking the link below.

Paul says that this fish was caught on a live pinfish about a mile north of Shell Cut, which is on the north end of the island. Congratulations, Paul! And congratulations to BoatUS for recognizing a great catch when they see one!

Would you like to live where you can catch fish like this? Well, it will be no surprise to you to hear that we can arrange it. Just drop us a note or give us a call and we can tell you how easy it can be.

Here is the link: http://www.boatus.com/angler/photos_2011.asp

Pine Island Fish Pix Part 19

With his family away, and no plans in sight, Brian and crew took to the water yesterday with fishing poles and a target. After a bumpy 20 mile ride the anchor was set and lines were hurling toward the bottom, anxious anglers above. Immediately we were reeling up small red grouper in the 14-18 inch range. Now these are fun to catch but not what we were looking for so lines came up and off we went.

The next stop yielded our bait; 3 squirrel fish and 4 B-liners. Later we would regret not staying longer and loading up while we had the chance.

Our final stop proved to be what we had been searching for. The first bait to hit the bottom was a live squirrel fish and you could instantly tell he was not thrilled about being down there. Less than a minute later it was apparent why, Fish On! From this point on the grouper were hungry and chomping on anything you threw in front of them. After losing two bruisers and landing 2 more, 10lbs or better, we were out of bait. Next on the hook were octopus which managed to fill our limit with keepers but never enticing the big boys to dine.

Back at the dock the crew posed with their catch. The main reason for this is to entice you to get down here and start catching. Why not give Brian or Mike a call and find out how affordable Pine Island is these days. And then send us YOUR fish pictures!

Pine Island Fish Pix Part 18

This is Adam again. Note the look of pain on his face while he holds this fish. We will admit that it is one of the biggest, if not the biggest, barracuda that we have seen. Adam says that he caught it in the gulf outside Charlotte Harbor and Pine Island. Actually, it looks big even though he is holding it tight against his chest. Imagine how big it would look if he had followed our usual recommendation of holding straight out in front of him at arm’s length? It would have been HUGE! The grimace on his face and the gloves are a nice touch, also.

Would you like to catch fish like this? We might even know where to go to get them. This is the life we lead here on Pine Island. Not only can we fish often, but we are near the beaches, island restaurants and bars, and much more. Why not give Brian or Mike a call and find out how affordable Pine Island is these days. And then send us your fish pictures!